obesity

Recent headlines have suggested that air pollution may contribute to growing obesity rates. It's a speculative hypothesis based on bad science.
Some cancers can be detected based on the fungi that grow within tumors, researchers say. Could this discovery lead to a life-saving screening technique? ACSH debated a pair of "fat acceptance" advocates on Dr. Phil. Let's take a closer look at the discussion.
Large segments of the science community have endorsed outright absurdities in recent years—biological sex is a "spectrum," obesity is a social construct, men can get pregnant. The list goes on. I make the case at BigThink that science is rapidly destroying its credibility by genuflecting on progressive political activists.
I recently appeared on "Dr. Phil" to discuss the fat-acceptance movement—a dangerous, misnamed "social justice" cause that needs to die an abrupt death. Let's break down the debate that ensued.
Continuing its trend of unjustified censorship, Twitter put a "warning" on one of our recent tweets "so people who don’t want to see sensitive content can avoid it." This protects nobody, but it denies the public access to credible health information.
Fat-acceptance advocates are pressuring TV executives to turn popular reality shows into platforms for social-justice advocacy. There is no better example of science-free cynicism.
The Conversation returns with another awful story about the dangers of "ultra-processed" food. Here's a look at the science they ignored—again.
Many Americans are obsessed with nutrition or totally disinterested in it. Why are these extremes so common? ACSH contributor David Lightsey joins us to explain. Public health officials committed many blunders during the pandemic. Part of the problem may have been the incomplete and often inaccurate information they were working with. How can they avoid the same errors next time around?
Recent news reports have spurred concern that just touching fentanyl can be dangerous. Let's take a look at the chemistry behind this claim. Comedian Bill Maher recently attacked the fat-acceptance movement as a danger to public health, sparking ferocious criticism on social media. Sadly, few people recognized the most important point about Maher's commentary: he was right.
Reporters have turned yet another study's underwhelming results into exaggerated headlines about the cognitive benefits of fruit consumption. Let's take a closer look at the paper in question.
A recent study has reporters worried that "ultra-processed" foods accelerate cognitive decline. Don't panic just yet.
Comedian Bill Maher is in trouble after attacking the fat-acceptance movement on his show last week. Not only was the segment hilarious, but it highlighted an important fact many people would rather not discuss: social-justice activists are rewriting science to protect their ideological commitments.